Spoofs of Absolut’s spoof…

Following, Absolut’s controversial Mexico advertising campaign, here are some spoofs that have sprung up over the last 48 hours:

Absolut rearrange - US

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Sparks continue to fly over Absolut ad

Since the publication of the Absolut Mexican ad campaign story, the comments have been flooding in and controversy around the campaign has been growing. You can see MexicoReporter.com’s 130+ comments here and comments on the La Plaza post, which have pushed past the 7000 mark, here.

Here’s an update on La Plaza with some more detail about the fallout, and Absolut have tried to address the mountain of complaints rolling in about the ad:

‘We have received many comments on an ad showing what an ABSOLUT world would look like from a Mexican point of view. We are sorry if we offended anyone. This was not our intention. We will try to explain. Though you may not agree, I hope you understand’

Vote on the ad here.

California reclaimed by Mexico? That’s the Absolut truth

Your humble correspondent was tickled to see this poster advertising campaign running across Mexico City this week.

Absolut

Absolut’s global advertising agency TBWA, and in this case their Mexican branch TERAN\TBWA, came up with an excellent, geographically specific angle.

The agency makes a play on Mexico’s ambiguous, love/hate relationship with its northern neighbour the United States. A map of the top half of the Americas is displayed, only in this version California, Arizona, Texas, New Mexico and other northern states remain part of Mexican territory, as it was before Mexico lost out to the US in the Mexican-American war.

Given Mexico’s national sense of pride and the often cited fact that California, as we know it now, once belonged to the Mexicans, the campaign will be warmly and no doubt humorously received south of La Frontera.

MexicoReporter assumes that Absolut is unlikely to run this campaign north of the border, but what if it does?……

Police linked to death threats of Veracruz newspaper

Diario El Mundo de Orizaba_1206053065236At around 10pm on Tuesday night of this week, Auricela Castro García, the publisher of El Mundo de Orizaba, a daily based in Orizaba in the southeastern state of Veracruz, received a phonecall.

Identifying himself as José Sánchez, the caller asked to speak to the publisher “for personal reasons.” The call was transferred to the editor, who said Castro was in a meeting and unavailable. The caller replied: “Tell her she has information, she knows what I am talking about, and if she publishes it, she will be killed.” Continue reading

‘La Misma Luna’ splits critics

Fox Searchlight - Under the Same Moon - Official Site_1205966977021La Misma Luna, or Under the Same Moon, made its Mexico City debut last week to a full house. The movie, which is the first Latino-centric feature from Fox Searchlight, tells the story of the separation of mother and son against the backdrop of thorny issue of immigration between Mexico and the United States.

The film has divided critics – which can only be a good sign. Your humble correspondent found it an enjoyable film which, although pulls at the heartstrings a little too gratuitously in places, portrays well the strong relationship between mother and son and also brings to a mainstream flick the important and political issue of immigration between Latin America and the United States. Continue reading

Mexico: Impunity and Collusion

Index on Censorship » for free expression_1205950003734Threats to reporters from government and criminals are making investigative journalism impossible, writes Deborah Bonello

In February this year, the car of Mexican journalist Estrada Zamora was found empty on the side of the road in the southern state of Michoacán with its engine running. Zamora was not inside and has not been seen since.

Click on the link above to read the full article, published today by Index on Censorship.

Violence censors journalists in Mexico

This is a version of an article which appeared in Press Gazette last month.

While traveling home through Pánuco, Veracruz with his 16 year old son in late January this year, Octavio Soto Torres, journalist and director of the Mexican daily Voces de Veracruz, was shot at by four masked gunmen. This was just the latest in the ongoing litany of attacks against journalists in Mexico. Torres, who escaped alive, is known for his harsh criticism of local authorities.

As Mexico continues its transition towards a real democracy and the administration of President Felipe Calderon ups its fights against narco-traffick and organized crime in the country, journalists who cover politics, drugs and crime take huge risks. Attacks take place nearly every week and few are ever investigated, according to NGOs monitoring freedom of expression issues in the country.

Although fewer journalists were murdered in Mexico last year than during 2006, the levels of violence and intimidation against them have increased, according to the Committee to Protect Journalist (CPJ) and Mexico’s own National Human Rights Commission.

So what are editors and journalists doing to avoid serious harm? Mostly nothing – literally. Continue reading